Image from Gramazio Kohler Research, ETH Zurich. Sourced at https://gramaziokohler.arch.ethz.ch/web/e/forschung/221.html
Image from Gramazio Kohler Research, ETH Zurich. Sourced at https://gramaziokohler.arch.ethz.ch/web/e/lehre/199.html
Image from Gramazio Kohler Research, ETH Zurich. Sourced at https://gramaziokohler.arch.ethz.ch/web/e/lehre/219.html

Metallhandel Grassmayr

Sub-Category:
Practice
Category:
Realised
Index:
25
Start Date:
2006
End Date:
2011
Role:
Principal Designer
Concept:
topological planar deformation
Duration (weeks):
231
No of Designs or Design Iterations:
1
No of Collaborators:
5
No of Students:
0
External Website:
Award | Exhibition:
German Design Award 2018
2018
Award selection process by invitation only
https://www.german-design-award.com/en/the-winners/gallery/detail/17672-the-face-of-recycling.html

Wing 

The building for a email recycling company in Innsbruck, Austria is reduced to a thin building skin that is wrapped around the functional layout and the logistic requirements. This expresses an architectural desire of draping skins around a complex set of internal processes. The surface structure is organised as a series of Z-shaped cross sections, which divide the space into an active zone, where the metal selection and hence a considerable amount of noise emissions take place, and into a quiet zone, with the management office and a volume for future extensions. The cross sections are adapted to different spatial situations across the skin, establishing the spaces for collecting, selecting, processing, financial transfers, monitoring the recycled metal markets, and supporting operations. There are strategic incisions into the surface allowing spaces to penetrate the surface where required and enable appropriate day-lighting.

Thin Surface 

Metal was the dominant choice for the construction of the building skin for the obvious reason relating to the building’s function of a metal recycling company, and to enable disassembly and recyclability. The building skin spans over a distance of 18 metres and is constructed as a lattice truss. Material and assembly logic follow a conventional array of steel I-beam sections as primary trusses, and smaller I-beam sections as secondary construction layer. The secondary structure is dimensioned to hold galvanised standing seam roof panels on the top and galvanised stretch metal sheets on the bottom. The perforated stretch metal mitigates acoustic emissions through absorption, and is additionally faceted to disperse any noise reflections. 

The TECTONIC appearance manifests itself in an interplay of disguise and revelation of structural and construction logics. Viewed from the front and beneath the roof, the construction is mostly hidden behind the smoothly curved stretched metal panels. The long and narrow perforated sheets themselves are unstable and soft until they are mounted onto the secondary system of steel beams. The orientation of the sheets is perpendicular to the steel structure and hence accentuates the sequential distribution of bent cross sections. At the bottom front edge of the cross section, the perforated panels reveal the primary structural system of I-beams that run across to the back and fold diagonally downwards and rest on the linear foundations. The concrete foundations are expressed as a narrow plinth, which slightly elevates the roof off the ground. The whole wing-like roof structure rests more firmly on two concrete volumes that lean outwards to articulate a continuous flow of forces from the roof into the ground, and on two Y-shaped steel columns. The surface bears strategic cuts at multiple locations for day lighting and spatial connections. At this moments of incision, the building skin almost dematerialises into and ultra-thin and highly accentuated surface, that is tailored, draped and deformed around differentiated spatial qualities.

Collaborators:
Thomas Feuerstein, Ekkehard Rainalter, Daniel Brecher, Christian Precht, Ursual Ender
Students:
No items found.
Images (c) Gramazio Kohler Research, ETH Zurich
Images (c) Gramazio Kohler Research, ETH Zurich
Images (c) Gramazio Kohler Research, ETH Zurich
Publications:
Publications:
pdf file download:
eth-49664-01.pdf
Publications:
pdf file download:
eth-49662-01_compressed.pdf
Publications:
Part 1 download pdf: 
eth-49663-01_compressed_01.pdf
Part 2 download pdf: 
eth-49663-01_compressed_02.pdf
External Website:
Collaborators:
Thomas Feuerstein, Ekkehard Rainalter, Daniel Brecher, Christian Precht, Ursual Ender
Students: