Image from Gramazio Kohler Research, ETH Zurich. Sourced at https://gramaziokohler.arch.ethz.ch/web/e/forschung/221.html
Image from Gramazio Kohler Research, ETH Zurich. Sourced at https://gramaziokohler.arch.ethz.ch/web/e/lehre/199.html
Image from Gramazio Kohler Research, ETH Zurich. Sourced at https://gramaziokohler.arch.ethz.ch/web/e/lehre/219.html

NextGenHighrise - Hybrid Construction

Sub-Category:
Research
Category:
Renewable
Index:
84
Start Date:
2019
End Date:
2021
Role:
PI Principal Investigator
Concept:
Duration (weeks):
108
No of Designs or Design Iterations:
1
No of Collaborators:
6
No of Students:
Award | Exhibition:
Biennale Architettura 2021 - How Will We Live Together?
2021
Contribution to the Singapore National Pavilion, to gather: The Architecture of Relationships
Averaging 465 visitors per day to the Singapore Pavilion (82,000+ visitors as of 15/11/2021)
https://to-gather.sg/
Next Generation Residential High-Rise: Evaluating and Comparing the Global Warming Potential of Different Structural Systems and Materials
2019
Symposium of the International Association for Shell and Spatial Structures (IASS 2019), Form and Force
Barcelona, Spain
Full Paper
Next Residential High-Rise - Comparative study and analytical modelling for flexible housing typologies based on modularity and composite structural systems
2018
Funded by the SUTD-MIT International Design Centre
Data-driven Embodied Carbon Evaluation of Early Building Design Iterations
2020
CAADRIA 2020, RE: Anthropocene - Design in the Age of Humans, Bangkok, Thailand, 5-8 August 2020
Full Paper
Computational Screening-LCA Tools for Early Design Stages
2020
Journal article, submitted to editors with final edits and publication in progress
Budig, Michael; Heckmann, Oliver; Hudert, Markus; Ng, Amanda; Xuereb Conti, Zack; Lork, Clement, Jun Hao
ISSN: 14780771
International Journal of Architectural Computing

The developed methodology and workflow on Embodied Carbon (EC) assessments and flexible building systems was initially specifically catered to residential projects in South East Asia, a region of massive urban expansion with increasing Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions. Since this is taking place in close proximity to one of the world’s largest forested areas with vast resources of wood, a renewable and sustainable material. The research was exploring the potentials and constraints of hybrid concrete-timber construction systems in residential typologies. Currently, the available concrete technologies are on a very advanced level whereas timber is  rarely applied in construction despite recent technological innovations and the increasing application in buildings around the world. The illustrated Concrete-Glulam system and Variant 2.1 below are inspired by CREE buildings, other hybrid systems exist in various forms. This specific timber-concrete system was also implemented in a school building in Singapore in 2019 with Kimly Construction.

After it has been replaced by concrete and steel as the predominant materials for the construction of cities in the past century, we are here assessing the potential impacts of partly supplementing concrete structures with timber. This has an immediate impact on the embodied carbon and indirectly offers the possibility of keeping the more lightweight timber elements adaptable during a building’s lifetime. We adopted the 'Open Building' approach and segmented designs into permanent support and adaptable infill systems.  Here, it goes further and differentiates into various degrees of flexibility in each of the main systems: concrete construction systems would normally be used as permanent support structures such as cores (containing circulation, infrastructure, and service functions), whereas partly load bearing components made from timber could be adapted and changed over long periods of time, and hence they would have a basic degree of flexibility. The infill systems are also further distinguished into conventional partitioning systems (such as drywalls that already have a higher degree of flexibility, but to the cost of their destruction) and modular systems that can be altered in various combinations.

Collaborators:
Oliver Heckmann, Amanda Ng Qi Boon, Clement Lork, Loo Jun Wen, Zachary Xuereb Conti, Ray Cheng Chern Xi
Students:
No items found.
Images (c) Gramazio Kohler Research, ETH Zurich
Images (c) Gramazio Kohler Research, ETH Zurich
Images (c) Gramazio Kohler Research, ETH Zurich
Publications:
Publications:
pdf file download:
eth-49664-01.pdf
Publications:
pdf file download:
eth-49662-01_compressed.pdf
Publications:
Part 1 download pdf: 
eth-49663-01_compressed_01.pdf
Part 2 download pdf: 
eth-49663-01_compressed_02.pdf
Collaborators:
Oliver Heckmann, Amanda Ng Qi Boon, Clement Lork, Loo Jun Wen, Zachary Xuereb Conti, Ray Cheng Chern Xi
Students: